Letter of Gerrit Smith, to the Liberty Party of New-Hampshire.

by Gerrit Smith

Publisher: s.n. in [Peterboro, N.Y.?

Written in English
Published: Downloads: 923
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Places:

  • United States

Subjects:

  • Liberty Party (N.H.),
  • Liberty Party (U.S.),
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 1845-1849.

Edition Notes

ContributionsPrinted Ephemera Collection (Library of Congress)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPortfolio 344, no. 13
The Physical Object
Pagination[4] p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL436042M
LC Control Number98145239

Gerrit Smith-Spooner and Others. 11/6/, Book Smith-Spooner, 12/, Unconstitutionality of Slavery Smith-Spooner, 12/4/, Partial Letter Spooner-Smith, 4/20/, Book Spooner-Smith, 3/13/, Argument Smith-Spooner, 3/17/, Argument Smith-Liberty Party, 3/18/, Advice Spooner-Smith, 7/3/, Argument Smith-Spooner, 7/8/ Visit the archives of the Gilder Lehrman Institute to read an August letter from Gerrit Smith, a staunch abolitionist, regarding the Free-Soil candidate, Martin Van Buren. Smith played a major role in the Liberty Party and was their presidential candidate in Guide to the microfilm edition of the Peter Smith papers, , and Gerrit Smith papers, by Microfilming Corporation of America (Book) Companions in conspiracy: John Brown & Gerrit Smith by Chester G Hearn (Book).   Gerrit Smith was a leading United States social reformer, abolitionist, politician, and philanthropist. Spouse to Ann Carroll Fitzhugh, Smith was a candidate for President of the United States in , , and , but only served 18 months in the federal government—in Congress as a Free Soil Party Representative, in –4.

In , Smith was elected to the U.S. Congress as a representative of the Liberty Party, whose last vestiges remained in central New York. Smith was an active Congressman but failed to complete his term, frustrated by his inability to motivate his colleagues to work to end slavery. Each class of opinion and feeling is represented in the letters which we have placed in another part of this week’s paper. The one from our friend Gerrit Smith, represents the view which the Liberty party take of this subject, and that of Mr. Robert Forten is consistent with the ground occupied by a majority of the American Anti-Slavery Society.   Following Prigg, and Garrison’s acceptance of the Taney Court’s construction of the Constitution as proslavery, Liberty Party cofounder Gerrit Smith circulated a letter calling the Constitution a “noble and beautiful Temple of Liberty,” and arguing that there were merely “pro-slavery exceptions” to the Constitution’s “reigning. Gerrit Smith () was a wealthy abolitionist from Utica, New York. He was the only abolitionist to hold a Congressional office, the president of the New York Anti-Slavery Society for three years, and a Station Master of the Underground Railroad. He also helped found the anti-slavery Liberty Party in

Liberty Party (Radical Abolitionists, Union) candidates gallery Former Representative Gerrit Smith from New York By , very little remained of the Liberty Party, after most of its membership left to join the Free Soil Party in and nearly all of what remained of it joined the Republicans in The papers of Gerrit Smith document Smith's concern with the temperance and abolition movements, the Liberty Party, his theory of compensation for slave owners, and his antipathy to land monopoly. Also included in the collection are broadsides and printed circulars. The Free Soil Party exists, wrote Quincy, Lib. not because, but in spite of the Liberty Part Mr. Leavitt 's prominent part in the nominating of Van Buren was very offensive to me (Ms. Novem , Gerrit Smith to W. L. G.). The Free Soil Party exists, wrote Quincy, Lib. not because, but in spite of the Liberty Party. Letters from Horace Greeley to Henry David Thoreau written on Octo and on Novem In the first letter, Greeley writes on having sold a copy of Thoreau's Ktaadn and The Maine Woods for $ and will send $ of this sale to Thoreau. He then asks Thoreau to thank Emerson for Emerson's last letter.

Letter of Gerrit Smith, to the Liberty Party of New-Hampshire. by Gerrit Smith Download PDF EPUB FB2

Smith, Gerrit () Letter of Gerrit Smith, to the Liberty Party of New-Hampshire. High-resolution images are available to schools and libraries via subscription to American History, Check to see if your school or library already has a subscription.

Title: Letter of Gerrit Smith, to the Liberty Party of New-Hampshire Criticizes the Liberty Party of New Hampshire for voting for slaveholders.

Encourages the state to reconstruct a "true" liberty party, "a Party, which will sooner perish than vote for a proslavery man- and a Party, too, which will practically recognize the doctrine of the. Letter of Gerrit Smith, to the Liberty Party of New-Hampshire.

Peterboro, March 18th, Gentlemen,--To-day's mail brings the news, that your state election has, again, gone against you. Gerrit Smith. Footnotes: The circular was probably the printed letter "To the Liberty Party of the County of Madison," Aug The antislavery convention at Pittsburgh on Augustwas organized by the Free Soil party in an attempt to unite all antislavery factions in a new Free Democratic Party.

Caption title. Letter dated: Peterboro February 6th LC copy inscribed in pencil on p. [2]: July 30 Also available on the Library of Congress Web site. LC copy transferred from the African American Pamphlet Collection. Formerly part of YA Collection: YA Gerrit Smith to President Grant Peterboro, November 4th, by: Smith, Gerrit, Published: () Letter of Gerrit Smith, to the Liberty Party of New-Hampshire.

Peterboro, March 18th, Gentlemen,--To-day's mail brings the news. Title Gerrit Smith Letter of Gerrit Smith General Ashley: [text of letter]. Contributor Names Smith, Gerrit, Ashley, James Mitchell, The Liberty Party was born in Albany, New York, on April 1,on the basis of pledges by its members not to support pro-slavery candidates for office.

Barns, Lemon - includes letters to Gerrit Smith from other correspondents Box 2: Barotti, Bartlett Expenses for Gerrit Smith (vol) Box Board book.

Gerrit Smith (March 6, – Decem ), also spelled Gerritt, Letter of Gerrit Smith a leading American social reformer, abolitionist, politician, and to Ann Carroll Fitzhugh, Smith was a candidate for President of the United States in, andbut only served 18 months in the federal government—in Congress as a Free Soil Party Representative, in –4.

Many, however, of the Liberty party accepted its sentiments, and held a convention in June,at Macedon, in the same State. The convention nominated Gerrit Smith for President and Elihu Burritt for the Vice-Presidency, separated from the party, took the name of Liberty League, and issued an address to the people.

The reference to slavery as “Naked Piracy” occurs in a published letter to the Liberty Party of 15 September of which Gerrit Smith was one of the signatories.

In this same communication, the Jerry rescue is referred to as “one of the most important and honorable events in. Gerrit Smith, (born March 6,Utica, New York, U.S.—died DecemNew York, New York), American reformer and philanthropist who provided financial backing for the antislavery crusader John Brown.

Smith was born into a wealthy family. In about he became an active worker in the cause of temperance, and in his home village, Peterboro, he built one of the first temperance. Resolutions and Address by Gerrit Smith at the National Liberty Party Convention held in Syracuse 30 September Dated "Oct.

1, " in pencil at top. Series ‒ Ecumenism. LETTER OF. CHARLES G. FINNEY. To Gerrit Smith. 7 May [Ms in the Gerrit Smith Papers, Syracuse University.] Gerrit Smith (), the wealthy philanthropist, and one of the largest landowners in America, was in sympathy with Oberlin, and had already, three years earlier, helped the struggling college financially.

It was through this project, however, that Gerrit Smith first became acquainted with John Brown. Inthe majority of the Liberty Party joined with the Free Soil Party.

A residual faction, the Liberty League, nominated Gerrit Smith for president. In the general election, Smith received 2, votes, a mere.1 per cent of the total votes cast. New York philanthropist and abolitionist, Gerrit Smith, for his impression of Kossuth and his mission.6 Smith, who is best remembered for his efforts to establish the Liberty Party in American politics, often advised Douglass on matters concerning the slavery question.7 During his rise to prominence in the 1 's, the Negro leader grew to respect.

One of the longest lasting of Smith's relationships was with Frederick Douglass since they both worked for the same cause and both were supporters of the Liberty Party. There is a picture of Smith at the Cazenovia anti-slavery meeting in which the handsome young Douglass stands in front of the older Gerrit Smith.

Smith is named (lower left) as the Party's candidate for President. In fact, Smith was elected to Congress inserving one frustrating term trying to advance an agenda that had several "peculiarities" listed in his thank you letter to the voters of the counties of Oswego and Madison.

During Smith's tenure in Washington, his daughter. The Liberty Party was a minor political party in the United States in the s (with some offshoots surviving into the s). The party was an early advocate of the abolitionist cause and it broke away from the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS) to advocate the view that the Constitution was an anti-slavery document.

William Lloyd Garrison, leader of the AASS, held the contrary view, that. Gerrit Smith was a widely known philanthropist and social reformer of the mid-nineteenth century.

He was born in Utica, NY, in and made his home in nearby Peterboro until his death in Smith's father, Peter Smith, was among the early white settlers of Madison originally moved to Utica to establish a land business after some years of trading with the local native inhabitants.

The current Republican Party had its origins in the abolitionist-oriented Liberty Party in the late s. Gerrit Smith was a major influence in the party’s formation because he had broken away from the colonizationists who advocated exporting free blacks from the.

Gerrit Smith was the benefactor and founder of our Oswego Public Library. As you enter the library, notice his lighted picture painted by Alonzo Pease just to the left of the magazine area.

Gerrit Smith was a noted abolitionist who openly invited fugitive slaves to his estate in Peterboro, New York. Many, however, of the Liberty party accepted its sentiments, and held a convention in June,at Macedon, in the same State. The convention nominated Gerrit Smith for President and Elihu Burritt for the Vice-Presidency, separated from the party, took the name of Liberty.

SMITH, GERRIT, a Representative from New York; born in Utica, N.Y., March 6, ; moved to Peterboro in ; attended an academy in Clinton, N.Y.; was graduated from Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y., in ; studied law; engaged in the management of a large estate which he inherited; delegate to the State conventions in and ; unsuccessful Liberty Party candidate for governor in   In a letter to Gerrit Smith, the presidential candidate for the Liberty Party, Griffith wrote, "[U]niversally benevolent as [Lind] is decent, the colored people are regarded by her as beneath.

Smith to editors of Freedom's Journal, 31 MarchLetter Book 1, Gerrit Smith Papers, Syracuse University. Smith's proposal for the Peterboro Manual Labor School appeared in The African Repository and Colonial Journal 10 (December ):   Gerrit Smith was born at Utica, N.Y., on the 6th March His Father, Peter Smith, a man of purely Holland blood, was widely known as a large land-holder, having traded very extensively with the Indians.

His Mother was a daughter of Col. Livingston of the Revolutionary army, and his maternal Grandmother was born and bred and [sic] Ireland. — A letter from Gerrit Smith to his party, dated 7 Mayurging them not to extend their platform beyond the issue of abolitionism.

A little over a year later, in a letter to the editors of The Emancipator, Smith would take the exact opposite position on the question of whether to add other issues to the Liberty Party platform.

Gerrit Smith wanted to solve the problems of the antebellum United States. He hated slavery, so he bankrolled John Brown. He believed in agrarianism, so he offered black families land grants in upstate New York. And though he had qualms about the electoral process, he overcame them and brought his u.

The town had been named for Gerrit Smith’s father. And, inthe candidate for president for the Liberty Party, James G. Birney, married Elizabeth Potts Fitzhugh, who was Smith’s sister-in-law. So as you can see, Smith was connected via family to some of the big wheels of his day.

1 A letter from Gerrit Smith to the Liberty Party "The political and military reformer. Devoted to the support of truly Republican principles -- of a well disciplined militia -- of an American system of education, and of sound literature and science.Users wishing to furnish copies or reviews of other materials related to Gerrit Smith are invited to contact the website editor.

Gerrit Smith was a widely known philanthropist and social reformer of the mid-nineteenth century. He was born in Utica, NY, in and made his home in .Gerrit Smith was elected president of the New York State Anti-Slavery Society inand began publication of approximately fifty essays on slavery printed in the form of circular letters.

By the decade of the s he also was helping slaves to escape and sheltering them at Peterboro before sending them on, usually to Canada.